Family Building and Fertility for the Transgender Community

Family Building and Fertility for the Transgender Community

If you are considering taking hormonal or surgical steps towards transitioning, one of the most important things to consider is cryopreservation of either your eggs or your sperm prior to the start of hormone blockers. These preserved gametes (eggs or sperm) can be used in the future to help complete a biological family building journey – whether you’re single or partnered at that time.

Transgender Family Building

We’ve pulled together a list of facts and questions that you may be wondering about your future family and fertility. Scroll to read more!

FAQs for Trans Persons

I plan on transitioning soon – what are my options to have a biological child in the future?

Talk to your physician about freezing your eggs or sperm before undergoing any hormonal or surgical treatment that may affect your fertility.

What does the sperm freezing process involve?

The process of sperm freezing involves a semen analysis (to evaluate your specimen before freezing), and bloodwork around the time that you freeze sperm. Fertility practices are evaluated by the FDA, and this testing will allow you to use your frozen specimen in the future.

How much sperm should you freeze? This will depend on many factors indicated by your initial semen analysis report. Your fertility specialist will be able to help you determine how many samples you should cryopreserve.

What does the egg freezing process involve?

Compared to freezing sperm, the egg-freezing process is a little bit more complicated – but is very common, so you should not have trouble finding a board-certified REI who is able to help you.

You would first take a few tests to evaluate your baseline fertility levels. Then, you would take fertility medication over the span of 2 weeks in order to ready your ovaries for a short in-house procedure called a transvaginal “egg retrieval.” You would also have to complete bloodwork around the time you freeze your eggs. Fertility practices are evaluated by the FDA, and completing this bloodwork will allow you to use those frozen eggs in a future conception cycle.

How long can eggs and sperm stay frozen?

To date, there is no known limit to how many years specimens can be cryopreserved. This allows trans people the opportunity to preserve their fertility early on in life, and then pursue family building in their 30s or 40s.

Of course, your family building plan will need to be personalized for you and your partner (if applicable). A chat with a reproductive endocrinologist is a good first step to build that plan.

I’m in the process of transitioning and I haven’t cryopreserved my eggs or sperm. What can I do?

Talk to your physician about your fertility options. They may refer you to chat with a fertility specialist to help plan your personal fertility and family building journey – which may include freezing eggs or sperm.

I’ve transitioned, or am in the process of transitioning. What are my options to use my cryopreserved (frozen) eggs or sperm?

Sperm cryopreservation_transgender

If you identify as MTF, male-to-female, or a transwoman, and have frozen sperm, there are a few options if you’re considering a biological family building journey.

    • If you’re in a relationship with a cisgender female, you can use your sperm and your partner’s eggs to complete an IUI or IVF journey to pregnancy
    • If you’re in a relationship with a cisgender man, you can use an egg donor and gestational carrier (surrogate) to create embryos with one or both of your sperm, and complete a pregnancy journey
    • If you’re single, you can use an egg donor and a gestational carrier (surrogate) to create embryos and complete a pregnancy journey

egg cryopreservation_transgenderIf you identify as FTM, female-to-male, or a transman, and have frozen eggs, there are a few options if you’re considering a biological family building journey

    • If you’re in a relationship with a cisgender woman, you could use your eggs and donor sperm to complete a reciprocal IVF cycle.
    • If you’re in a relationship with a cisgender man, you can use donor or your partner’s sperm to complete a pregnancy journey. Some of these journeys may require a gestational carrier.
    • If you’re single, you can use donor sperm to complete a pregnancy journey. This may require a gestational carrier.

If you don’t think your personal situation fits into any of the categories above – not to worry! The first step to building your plan is to chat with a fertility specialist, who will help you navigate your personal path to parenthood.

Fertility Preservation for Trans Persons

Finding a provider that is LGBTQ-friendly is important – family and fertility are personal topics, and we want you to be as comfortable as possible as you embark on your path to parenthood. One tool that we recommend for choosing an LGBTQ-friendly practice is the Healthcare Equality Index (HEI) put out each year by the Human Rights Campaign.

Gay Parents To Be and RMA of Connecticut have been named an HEI leader for the last three years in a row, indicating that we uphold the highest standards of LGBTQ inclusivity for patients & staff.

Are you interested in learning more about a semen analysis or baseline fertility testing? If so, read more here! You can also schedule a chat with us here at Gay Parents To Be if you think you’re ready to start building your personal plan.


Contact Us to Schedule Your Chat


 

Dr. Mark P. Leondires

Dr. Mark P. Leondires

Dr. Mark P. Leondires, Medical Director and lead infertility doctor with Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), is board-certified in both Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility.

Read More
No Comments